Hazard Communication
  • CODE : KEIT-0007
  • Duration : 60 Minutes
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Keith Warwick, PE earned a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of California at Davis. He became a California Professional Engineer in 1983 and has also held PEs in Indiana, Tennessee, Illinois and New York. He has 34 years of civil, environmental and safety engineering experience. He is a professor at Yuba College in Marysville California and has experience teaching engineering, safety and related subjects.

Mr. Warwick has conducted several hundred construction, environmental and safety walk-throughs and audits. He is the author of Arcadia Publishing’s, “California’s Highway 99: Modesto to Bakersfield”.


It is necessary to ensure that the hazards of all chemicals produced or imported are transmitted to employers and employees. The transmittal of information is to be accomplished by means of comprehensive hazard communication programs, which are to include container labeling and other forms of warning, safety data sheets, and employee training. This occupational safety and health standard is intended to address the potential hazards of chemicals and communicate information concerning protective measures including personal protective equipment to employees.

Communicating information concerning hazards and appropriate protective measures to employees may include, making provisions for developing and maintaining a written hazard communication program for the workplace; including lists of hazardous chemicals present; labeling containers of chemicals in the workplace, as well as of containers of chemicals being shipped to other workplaces; preparation and distribution of safety data sheets to employees and downstream employers; and development of employee training programs.

Learning Objectives

  • An effective Hazard Communication program developed in accordance with OSHA CFR 29 is essential to avoid costly and disruptive injurie
  • Understand how to get Senior management commitment to hazard communication and obtain funding for the program
  • Integrate knowledge about Hazard Communication with the purpose of the facility
  • Learning how the development and implementation of a training program for Hazard Communication is essential
  • Using budgeted funds efficiently
  • How to develop and implement a hands-on training program.

Areas Covered

  • An effective Hazard Communication program developed in accordance with OSHA CFR 29: 1910:1200 is essential to avoid costly and disruptive injuries
  • This occupational safety and health standard is intended to address comprehensively the issue of classifying the potential hazards of chemicals
  • Communicating information concerning hazards and appropriate protective measures to employees
  • Communicating information concerning hazards and appropriate protective measures to employees including developing and maintaining a written hazard communication program for the workplace.
  • Listing of hazardous chemicals present; labeling of containers of chemicals in the workplace, as well as of containers of chemicals being shipped to other workplaces.
  • Preparation and distribution of safety data sheets to employees and downstream employers
  • Development and implementation of employee training programs regarding hazards of chemicals and protective measures.

Who Should Attend

  • Construction company managers, Construction project owners, Construction workers
  • Industrial facility owner, Industrial facility managers, Industrial facility supervisors
  • Factory workers
  • Regulators
  • OSHA
  • Professors and Instructors
  • Students
  • Families of employees
  • Human resources managers
  • Engineers
  • Scientists
  • Technicians
  • Facility managers

Who Should Attend

An effective Hazard Communication Program developed in accordance with OSHA CFR 29 is essential to avoid costly and disruptive injuries. Establishing effective Hazard Communication will help your facility to withstand scrutiny by regulators. Developing and implementing a Hazard Communication program will not eliminate but will reduce your liability if there is an accident. This training will help protect your employee’s health.

Topic Background

Before 1970 there was not an organized codified effort for Hazard Communication at the federal level. Contamination sites, as well as accidents, prompted the formation of OSHA. The environmental movements of the 1960s, I believe contributed to the formation of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. There has always been a need for hazard communication, so this regulation was enacted.Communicating information concerning hazards and appropriate protective measures to employees is essential for an employee’s morale, and safety.

  • $200.00



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